Der
Dramatiker John
Dryden

John Dryden (* August 1631. in Aldwincle; † Mai 1700. in London) war ein einflussreicher englischer DichterLiteraturkritiker und Dramatiker.

...

  • The Wild Gallant (1663)

  • Astraea Redux (1660)

  • The Rival Ladies (?)

  • The Indian Emperor (1667)

  • Annus Mirabilis (1667)

  • An Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

  • Tyrannick Love (1669)

  • Marriage A-la-Mode (1672)

  • The Conquest of Granada (1670)

  • Amboyna, or the Cruelties of the Dutch to the English Merchants (1673)

  • All for Love (1678)

  • Oedipus (1679)

  • Absalom and Achitophel (1681)

  • The Medal (1682)

  • Religio Laici (1682)

  • The Hind and the Panther (1687)

  • Amphitryon (1690)

  • Don Sebastian (1690)

  • King Arthur (1691)

  • Amboyna

  • The Works of Virgil (1697)

  • Fables, Ancient and Modern (1700)

Absalom and Achitophel
(1681)

Das Stück sollte die öffentliche Meinung zum Zeitpunkt des Prozesses gegen Shaftesbury beeinflussen, der wegen Verrat angeklagt war, und wurde vom Autor zu diesem Zweck in die Form einer biblischen Allegorie gegossen, in der die zeitgenössischen Ereignisse der Erzählung über die Rebellion von Absalom gegen König David im zweiten Buch Samuel "im Hintergrund hinterlegt" wurden.

Das in Versen geschriebene Stück verbindet dabei epische Größe, scharfes satirisches Porträt und skurrilen Spott, und gipfelt schließlich in einer langen Rede, die die Rede Charles des II. "Erklärung an alle seine liebenden Subjekte" (Declaration to all his Loving Subjects) vom 8. April 1681 widerspiegelt, und in der auf der Stückebene "König David" majestätisch sein königliches Vorrecht auf seine "genehmigende Begleitung" des göttlichen Donners geltend macht.

Zitiert nach David Hopkins "John Dryden", Northcote House Publishers, Horndon 2004, mit freundlicher Genehmigung des Autor. Please visit www.writersandtheirwork.co.uk

Rechte der Übersetzung © medias  ohg verlag und produktion.

Originaltext: The play was designed to affect public opinion at the time of Shaftesburys trial for treason, is cast in the form of a biblical allegory in which contemporary events are "shadowed" in a narrative of the rebellion of Absalom against King David in the Second Book of Samuel. The poem combines epic grandeur, sharp satiric portraiture, and scurrilous lampoon, and culminates in a lengthy speech, closely sembling Charles II's "Declaration to all his Loving Subjects" from the 8 of April 1681, in which "King David" majestically asserts his royal prerogative to the approving accompaniment of divine thunder.

john dryden an introduction john dryden

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was born on nights of orcas 1631 in the

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village rectory of Al Twinkle near fraps

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10 in Northamptonshire and grew up in a

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nearby village in 1644 he was sent to

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Westminster School as a king's scholar

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and then obtained his BA in 1650 for

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graduating top of the list for Trinity

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College Cambridge returning to London

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during the Protectorate Dryden found

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work with Cromwell Secretary of State

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John furlough at cromwell's funeral on

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November 23rd 1658 he found company with

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the Puritan poets John Milton and Andrew

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Marvell the setting was to be a sea

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change in English history from Republic

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to monarchy and from one set of lauded

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poets - what would soon become the age

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of Dryden later that year he published

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the first of his great poems heroic

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stances in 1658 the eulogy on Cromwell's

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death with the restoration of the

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monarchy in 1660

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Dryden's celebrated in verse with

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Austria Redux an authentic royalist

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panegyric and with the reopening of the

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theatres he began to also write plays

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his first the wild gallant appeared in

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1663 and whilst not successful he was

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contracted to produce three plays a year

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for the King's company in which he

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became a shareholder during the 16

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sixties and seventies

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theatrical writing was his main source

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of income in 1667 he published annus

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mirabilis a lengthy historical poem

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which described the English defeat of

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the Dutch naval feat and the Great Fire

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of London this work established him as

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the preeminent poet of his generation

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and was crucial in his attaining the

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posts of poet laureate in 1668 and a

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couple of years later historiography a

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royal as his talent encompass

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many forms from poetry to plays to

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translations in 1694 he began work on

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what would be his most ambitious and

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defining work as a translator the works

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of Virgil which was published in 1697 by

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subscription it was a national event

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john dryden died on 12th of may 1700 and

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was initially buried in st. Anne's

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Cemetery in Soho before being exhumed

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and reburied in Westminster Abbey ten

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days later

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farewell ungrateful traitor by John

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Dryden

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farewell ungrateful traitor farewell my

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perjured Swain let never injured

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creature believe a man again the

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pleasure of possessing surpasses all

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expressing but is too short a blessing

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and love too long a pain it is easy to

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deceive us in pity of your pain but when

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we love you leave us to rail at you in

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vain before we have described it there

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is no bliss beside it but she that once

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has tried it will never love again the

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passion you pretended was only to obtain

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but when the charm is ended the charmer

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you disdain your love by hours we

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measure till we have lost our treasure

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but dying is a pleasure when living is a

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pain one happy moment by John Dryden oh

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no poor suffering heart no change

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endeavor choose to sustain the smart

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rather than leave her my ravished eyes

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behold such arms about her I can die

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with her but not live without her

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one-tenth a sigh of hers to see me

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languish will more than pay the price of

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my past anguish

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beware o cruel fare how you smile on me

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it was a kind look of yours that has

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undone me love has in store for me one

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happy minute and she will end my pain

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who did begin it when no day void of

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bliss or pleasure leaving ages shall fly

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the way without perceiving Cupid shall

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guard the door the more to please us and

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keep out time and death when they would

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seize us time and death shall depart and

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say in flying love has found out a way

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to live by dying

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can life be a blessing by john dryden

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can life be a blessing or worth the

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possessing can life be a blessing if

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love were away

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oh no though I love all night keeps us

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waking and though he torment us with

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cares all the day yet he sweetens he

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sweetens our pains in the taking there's

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an hour at the last there's an hour to

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repay in every possessing the ravishing

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blessing in every possessing the fruits

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of our pain poor lovers forget long ages

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of anguish were tear they have suffered

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and done to obtain tis a pleasure a

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pleasure to sigh and to languish when we

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hope where we hope to be happy again

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a song the st. Cecilia's day by john

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dryden from harmony from heavenly

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harmony this universal frame began when

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nature underneath the heap of jarring

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atoms lay and could not heave her head

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but tuneful voice was heard from high

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arise ye more than dead then cold and

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hot and moist and dry in order to their

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stations leap and musics power obey from

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harmony from heavenly harmony this

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universal frame began from harmony to

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harmony through all the compass of the

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notes it ran the diapason closing full

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in man what pression cannot music raise

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and quell when do Bell struck the corded

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shell his listening brethren stood

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around and wandering on their faces fell

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to worship that celestial sound less

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than a god they thought there could not

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dwell within the hollow of that shell

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but spoke so sweetly and so well what

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passion cannot music raise and quell

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the trumpets loud clang er excites us to

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arms with shrill notes of anger and

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mortal alarms the double double double

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beat of the thundering drum cries hark

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the foes come charge charge

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tis too late to retreat a soft

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complaining flute in dying notes

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discovers the woes of hopeless lovers

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whose dirge is whispered by the warbling

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lute sharp violins proclaim their

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jealous pangs and desperation fury

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frantic indignation depths of pains and

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height of passion for the fair

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disdainful Dame but oh what art can

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teach what human voice can reach the

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sacred organs praised notes inspiring

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holy laugh notes that wing their

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heavenly ways to mend the choirs above

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Orpheus could lead the savage race and

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trees unrooted left their place

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sequester's of the lyre but bright

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Cecilia raised the Wonder higher when to

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her organ vocal breath was given an

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angel heard and straight appeared

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mistaking earth for heaven