Der
Dramatiker John
Dryden

John Dryden (* August 1631. in Aldwincle; † Mai 1700. in London) war ein einflussreicher englischer DichterLiteraturkritiker und Dramatiker.

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ALLE STÜCKE IN CHRONOLOGISCHER REIHENFOLGE
  • The Wild Gallant (1663)

  • Astraea Redux (1660)

  • The Rival Ladies (?)

  • The Indian Emperor (1667)

  • Annus Mirabilis (1667)

  • An Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

  • Tyrannick Love (1669)

  • Marriage A-la-Mode (1672)

  • The Conquest of Granada (1670)

  • Amboyna, or the Cruelties of the Dutch to the English Merchants (1673)

  • All for Love (1678)

  • Oedipus (1679)

  • Absalom and Achitophel (1681)

  • The Medal (1682)

  • Religio Laici (1682)

  • The Hind and the Panther (1687)

  • Amphitryon (1690)

  • Don Sebastian (1690)

  • King Arthur (1691)

  • Amboyna

  • The Works of Virgil (1697)

  • Fables, Ancient and Modern (1700)

john dryden an introduction john dryden

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was born on nights of orcas 1631 in the

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village rectory of Al Twinkle near fraps

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10 in Northamptonshire and grew up in a

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nearby village in 1644 he was sent to

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Westminster School as a king's scholar

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and then obtained his BA in 1650 for

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graduating top of the list for Trinity

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College Cambridge returning to London

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during the Protectorate Dryden found

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work with Cromwell Secretary of State

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John furlough at cromwell's funeral on

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November 23rd 1658 he found company with

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the Puritan poets John Milton and Andrew

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Marvell the setting was to be a sea

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change in English history from Republic

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to monarchy and from one set of lauded

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poets - what would soon become the age

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of Dryden later that year he published

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the first of his great poems heroic

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stances in 1658 the eulogy on Cromwell's

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death with the restoration of the

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monarchy in 1660

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Dryden's celebrated in verse with

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Austria Redux an authentic royalist

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panegyric and with the reopening of the

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theatres he began to also write plays

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his first the wild gallant appeared in

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1663 and whilst not successful he was

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contracted to produce three plays a year

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for the King's company in which he

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became a shareholder during the 16

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sixties and seventies

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theatrical writing was his main source

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of income in 1667 he published annus

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mirabilis a lengthy historical poem

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which described the English defeat of

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the Dutch naval feat and the Great Fire

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of London this work established him as

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the preeminent poet of his generation

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and was crucial in his attaining the

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posts of poet laureate in 1668 and a

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couple of years later historiography a

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royal as his talent encompass

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many forms from poetry to plays to

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translations in 1694 he began work on

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what would be his most ambitious and

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defining work as a translator the works

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of Virgil which was published in 1697 by

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subscription it was a national event

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john dryden died on 12th of may 1700 and

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was initially buried in st. Anne's

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Cemetery in Soho before being exhumed

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and reburied in Westminster Abbey ten

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days later

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farewell ungrateful traitor by John

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Dryden

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farewell ungrateful traitor farewell my

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perjured Swain let never injured

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creature believe a man again the

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pleasure of possessing surpasses all

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expressing but is too short a blessing

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and love too long a pain it is easy to

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deceive us in pity of your pain but when

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we love you leave us to rail at you in

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vain before we have described it there

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is no bliss beside it but she that once

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has tried it will never love again the

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passion you pretended was only to obtain

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but when the charm is ended the charmer

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you disdain your love by hours we

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measure till we have lost our treasure

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but dying is a pleasure when living is a

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pain one happy moment by John Dryden oh

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no poor suffering heart no change

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endeavor choose to sustain the smart

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rather than leave her my ravished eyes

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behold such arms about her I can die

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with her but not live without her

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one-tenth a sigh of hers to see me

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languish will more than pay the price of

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my past anguish

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beware o cruel fare how you smile on me

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it was a kind look of yours that has

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undone me love has in store for me one

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happy minute and she will end my pain

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who did begin it when no day void of

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bliss or pleasure leaving ages shall fly

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the way without perceiving Cupid shall

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guard the door the more to please us and

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keep out time and death when they would

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seize us time and death shall depart and

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say in flying love has found out a way

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to live by dying

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can life be a blessing by john dryden

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can life be a blessing or worth the

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possessing can life be a blessing if

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love were away

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oh no though I love all night keeps us

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waking and though he torment us with

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cares all the day yet he sweetens he

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sweetens our pains in the taking there's

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an hour at the last there's an hour to

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repay in every possessing the ravishing

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blessing in every possessing the fruits

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of our pain poor lovers forget long ages

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of anguish were tear they have suffered

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and done to obtain tis a pleasure a

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pleasure to sigh and to languish when we

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hope where we hope to be happy again

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a song the st. Cecilia's day by john

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dryden from harmony from heavenly

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harmony this universal frame began when

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nature underneath the heap of jarring

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atoms lay and could not heave her head

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but tuneful voice was heard from high

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arise ye more than dead then cold and

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hot and moist and dry in order to their

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stations leap and musics power obey from

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harmony from heavenly harmony this

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universal frame began from harmony to

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harmony through all the compass of the

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notes it ran the diapason closing full

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in man what pression cannot music raise

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and quell when do Bell struck the corded

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shell his listening brethren stood

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around and wandering on their faces fell

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to worship that celestial sound less

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than a god they thought there could not

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dwell within the hollow of that shell

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but spoke so sweetly and so well what

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passion cannot music raise and quell

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the trumpets loud clang er excites us to

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arms with shrill notes of anger and

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mortal alarms the double double double

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beat of the thundering drum cries hark

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the foes come charge charge

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tis too late to retreat a soft

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complaining flute in dying notes

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discovers the woes of hopeless lovers

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whose dirge is whispered by the warbling

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lute sharp violins proclaim their

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jealous pangs and desperation fury

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frantic indignation depths of pains and

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height of passion for the fair

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disdainful Dame but oh what art can

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teach what human voice can reach the

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sacred organs praised notes inspiring

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holy laugh notes that wing their

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heavenly ways to mend the choirs above

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Orpheus could lead the savage race and

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trees unrooted left their place

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sequester's of the lyre but bright

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Cecilia raised the Wonder higher when to

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her organ vocal breath was given an

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angel heard and straight appeared

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mistaking earth for heaven